The Key to Transforming Instruction: Learning How to Learn

For teachers to transform their classroom practice, the most important skill may be their ability to learn how to learn.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blogs.edweek.org

It is true, until we do not realize that we need to change the way we are approaching our students, until we do not try learning with technology ourselves (I’m not talking about using PPT’s), we will not change our chips about the way we teach. At the end of the day it’s  just a matter of attitude.

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¿Cómo será la educación del futuro?

Un estudio de la ONG estadounidense Getting Smart hace algunas proyecciones y presenta cómo podría ser la educación del futuro, en concreto en 2035.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ideasqueinspiran.com

Me parece súper interesante lo de  “se acabará la titulitis” Obtener los títulos académicos tras completar los cursos correspondientes al colegio, la escuela secundaria o la universidad seguirá siendo importante.Los estudiantes necesitarán demostrar sus competencias en distintas áreas.

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Breaking the Mold: School Fosters Design and Discovery

Modern learning is more about discovery. It’s not so much waiting as doing, says Will Richardson. Learners should be empowered to continue learning and to use their interests to fuel projects that they care about. Richardson had some ideas about how teachers can begin to move away from content delivery and towards a model that is supportive of individual learners.

Source: blogs.kqed.org

In Peru, those with control over education policy are making decisions on the old model of schooling — knowledge held by teachers who deliver information to students — while young learners are clamoring for something different.

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How the Power of Interest Drives Learning

Research shows that interests powerfully influence our academic and professional choices. When we’re interested in a task, we work harder and persist longer, bringing more of our self-regulatory skills into play.

Source: blogs.kqed.org

So what is interest? Interest is a psychological state of engagement, experienced in the moment, and also a predisposition to engage repeatedly with particular ideas, events, or objects over time. Why do we have it? Interest acts as an “approach urge” that pushes back against the “avoid urges” that would keep us in the realm of the safe and familiar. Interest pulls us toward the new, the edgy, the exotic. Interest “diversifies experience.” But interest also focuses experience. In a world too full of information, interests usefully narrow our choices.

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