Tonight’s homework, class: playing well with others

See on Scoop.itHot Issues in Education

Educators call it social-emotional learning – skills that ensure students are better learners; better neighbors; better citizens, employees or bosses; and better team players. Lakeshore is among 48 of the district’s 107 elementary and middle schools that are incorporating a program called Second Step, which teaches a range of skills in each grade, kindergarten through eighth, including how to listen, how to manage stress, how to be empathetic and deal with conflict. Program expandingEventually, all K-8 students in the district will participate in Second Step lessons as part of their regular schooling, learning self management, self- and social awareness, and relationship skills. […] it’s what great teachers already do. The Lakeshore student turned to a classmate and whispered the sentence he had heard, who then repeated it into the ear of the next person and so on until the last student in the circle whispered the sentence back to the teacher. The eight California districts incorporating social-emotional school won’t make sure every student is taught the skills, but schools will be held accountable for whether kids learned them. […] the districts have promised the federal government they will do that. Special status Instead, the districts, which also include Long Beach, Los Angeles, Sacramento, Sanger, Fresno and Santa Ana, have created their own plan to judge district and school performance – one that includes academic test scores as well as social-emotional assessments. The districts are rolling out social-emotional programs and ways to measure them, with schools to be held accountable by the 2015-16 school year, said Noah Bookman, chief accountability officer for California Office to Reform Education, which is coordinating the eight districts’ efforts. Establishing and maintaining healthy and rewarding relationships by communicating clearly, listening actively, cooperating, resisting inappropriate social pressure, negotiating conflict constructively, and seeking and offering help. Making good choices based on consideration of ethical standards, safety concerns, social norms, the realistic evaluation of consequences, and the well-being of self and others.

Cecilia Rosas‘s insight:

Schools in San Francisco, Oakland and a handful of districts across the States are redefining what students need to know and ensuring that schools teach it. In the simplest terms, the districts say kids need to be able to play nice, and it will be the job of public schools to make sure they know how.

Educators call it social-emotional learning – skills that ensure students are better learners; better neighbors; better citizens, employees or bosses; and better team players.

See on www.sfgate.com

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